Volume 4, Issue 1, June 2020, Page: 1-7
Consequences of Violence Against Women: Amhara Regional State, East Gojjam Zone High-school and Preparatory Schools as a Case in Point
Genanew Jemberu Engida, Department of Civic and Ethical Studies, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Adane Mengest Tessma, Department of Civic and Ethical Studies, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Mulugeta Nega Gobeze, Department of Civic and Ethical Studies, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Received: Nov. 13, 2019;       Accepted: Nov. 28, 2019;       Published: Apr. 17, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.stpp.20200401.11      View  306      Downloads  114
Abstract
Violence are different in its extent, and in advanced contraries men’s are exposed for violence by women but in the Ethiopian context, men’s are the perpetuator for violence and violence against women is common and has been growing from time to time. Cognizant of this gap, this study attempted to explore the consequences of violence against women: the case of East Gojjam Zone particularly in high-School and preparatory schools as a case in point. To meet the objective of the study, qualitative method with the case study design was used. In this study, eighteen semi structure interviewees, seven key informants’ eight focus group discussants, were participated. All of the participants were selected by using non probability sampling technique specifically purposive sampling. Therefore, the data sources were primary data. Semi-structured interview, key informant interview and FGDs were used as a tool for collecting primary data. To analyze the data thematic analysis methods was employed. The findings from the study revealed that violence against women have so many consequences such as constricting the scope of women students activity, negative impact on women and girls health outcome, poor school performance, psychological impact, drop out, disrupting their lives and behavioral change and poverty. The study has concluded that violence against women at school level have several consequences. Based on the conclusion, recommendations are forwarded in line with the major finding of the study. Such as, Schools should create awareness for the communities to stop Violence against women and its negative consequences through different training, schools should strength gender club to build up the capacity of women students regarding on struggling violence against women to enhance self-confidence, to report and follow up on VAW at or around the schools, mainstream activities related to prevent violence against school women’s in school system should be incorporated, provide training to parents in alternative methods for disciplining children and useful ideas on child rearing, women students should aware and eliminated peer pressure and others the motivating factors which exposed themselves for violence, the schools should create income-generating activities for schoolgirls coming from poor families to empower them economically.
Keywords
Violence, Consequences of Violence, Violence Against Women, Perpetuator of Violence
To cite this article
Genanew Jemberu Engida, Adane Mengest Tessma, Mulugeta Nega Gobeze, Consequences of Violence Against Women: Amhara Regional State, East Gojjam Zone High-school and Preparatory Schools as a Case in Point, Science, Technology & Public Policy. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.stpp.20200401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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